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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
to emergency. still a tough environment to be operating for the foreseeable future. you think you will be able to improve upon the final management that has been made in the past five years? the senate version of fiscal year continue resolution that we passed yesterday in the senate cuts about $17 million from the department's management functions, and just tell us what could be the practical impact of reduction of that nature. for example, does this put in jeopardy to departments ability to do rigorous views of rigorous reviews that gao recommends? >> you don't run an operational department without the bill to hire, retain and manage. without the bill to procure goods and services without the ability run your financial system from and accountability point of view. all of those will be affected by cuts. things may take longer. there may be aspects of things we don't get to as thoroughly as we would like under other circumstances. our job is to limit any negative affect and prioritize, part of the leadership job. >> all right. dr. coburn, please proceed. >> secretary lute, i know you know i app
people together. partly it was the environment and the sicks that we had to confront -- circumstances that we had to cold front. as nk what has changed is she said we would work longer weeks and people were there for longer periods of time. the venues for communication were at hand. she will remember this well. we used to have two lunch tables that were just for senators and you sit family style. people would have lunch together. for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we getting together and one was around our spouses and we would salute our spouses. we would do things like that. people now leave washington more routinely on thursday or fridays and they don't come back until monday or tuesday. you are left to combovepb on wednesday. you condition govern a country as big and sophisticated a this is. they were in session for 11 days in february. partly, we have to ground the airplane. you have to stay here. i like the suggestion that maybe what we out to do is have blocks of time where you don't go home. you're there from january to june then
republicans, the republicans that cared about the environment and privacy are absolutely excluded and fearful of speaking up. >> hal: right. >> caller: and that is really the mind-control the thought-control police that people have to look at as the example of where we don't want to go. i think it's so critical. >> hal: i always find it very shocking when there's this belief on the right that the expression of someone else's rights that are in the constitution, in the bill of rights, the acting on those rights in your own way is somehow a violation of theirs simply because it differs with their religious beliefs or makes them feel icky. if i'm creeped out, i don't want them to make it legal, because then i have to explain it to my kid. and the kid is more hip than you are, and the kid is like it's okay with me. and then you have to have a conversation with what your belief system is. you used to not even have to talk about it. if somebody got pregnant that wasn't supposed to. you sent her off to her aunt and she became unpregnant. >> i think you are right. th
] ♪ ♪ [applause] >> so being in a classroom environment, i usually get in a lot of debates with professors and teachers, so i'm going to give everybody a tip on how to debate a liberal for the upcoming year. if they ever say liberalism works, just say look at illinois. i'm ooh from illinois, and if you want to see liberal policies at work, come to illinois. we have about $100 billion in unfunded pensions, our last four governors in jail, it's one of the most corrupt governments not just in the country -- time magazine rated the most corrupt goth -- governments in the world. number one was venezuela, number two was north korea, number three was illinois. [laughter] now, illinois' really bad, but if i take a drive about an hour and a half north on i-94, i start to get a smile on my face, and i pass into the dairy state. [cheers and applause] i get a smile because i know i'm in a state that has a leader. a state that has a leader that stood up to special interests, that looked the unions in the eye and made reforms that were not really popular at the time but are now proven effective. conserv
-chairs heard of the need for an environment of intellectual curiosity that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hack-a-thons in tax-heavy cities like san francisco, austin, denver and new york to forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we'll embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we'll upgrade gop.com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're going to be setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to the silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologynologists -- technologists to join in our efforts and serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all of this, we'll enter 2014 and 2016 with a
groups based in san francisco arguing that electric lights will endanger the environment and we'll have at least three lawyers running ads that say you can be killed by electricity. if someone tries to put electricity if n your house call us and we'll sue them for you. both parties are prisoners of the past. they are trapped in the ideas nd mind set. they they are all trapped in the age of candles. the first effort in electric light was 1800. in 189 thomas edson's laboratory had the first successful electric light. it lasted 13.5 hours. within a few months, edson hit and using carbonized bamboo the first practical light lasted 1,200 hours. this is the spirit we have lost. it seems determined to avoid thinking about it. edson said "we will make electricity so cheap that only the rich will burn candles." [laughter] [applause] i want to tell you that i've been trying to get the house of representatives to understand they can video v a hearing every week on the future and every committee and sub committee. they can be contrasting the burekic candle that are trapped with all the break throug
both, create a better environment for jobs but also live within our means. >> talk act reality, as well. you just heard it. no ratio of spending cuts to revenue increases republicans will accept. democrats will not cut or reform entitlements on their own. so there is no grand bargain to be had. >> it's the problem overall. one of the frustrations in washington is the fact you have on one hand the entitlement issue and you said democrats aren't going to move the direction without more tax revenue. on the other hand, you have republicans saying hey, if we're going to have tax reform we should reform it, get rid of the loopholes but put it into lowering rates to stimulate the economy. >> chris mathews, you made a point this week on a panel discussion saying you don't think the republicans are telling the whole story. they don't want to cut medicare or social security either. >> the problem is both sides are in positions they're happy to be in. that's why they all prefer sequestration to the next situation, which is if you're a republican, the democrats are basically saying -- i'm speaking
environment. >> i am glad you brought up the fact that you're dealing with the c.r.'s. it has been suggested that this is on you. let's take the timeout the last three years. was it your idea to pass a 14- day continuing resolution or a 21-day continuing resolution? or a seven-day, 165-day, a one- day, a six-day? how you run a government or a branch of government with c.r.'s that go for that short amount of time? how do you adequately budget for that? >> it is very difficult. we err on the side of being conservative, as we have here, to make sure we are not deficient at the end of any given continuing resolution. it is difficult. we are a very large operation. we are taking in over 400,000 people a year. and if it has to go on for the full year. when you are in an environment where you do not know what your budget is going to be on the various marks and the house and the senate are different, when you are looking at sequestration, it is a challenge and you do your best under the circumstances to come up with the right answer. >> as you went through the releases and you sit here today, do you
today's complicated issues in today's environment? >> would you agree there is some responsibility on the part of the members of congress to educate themselves to be able to speak about this? >> absolutely. >> because we were knee deep in the fight and they had no clue. >> you are absolutely right. i spent basically 14 months doing nothing but talking about health care reform. and i would walk into a room in my district with 50 people who wr were ready to strangle me, and spend 50 minutes going through the options, and after that period of time, they would walk out and say, hey, this sounds great. but it totally was an education process, and we didn't do -- as a party we didn't do very good job of that. individual people did better than others for sure. >> hal: right. and we only have a couple of seconds left with you, and first of all i want to thank you for being the congressman from the great state of kentucky but there is one other issue, and i want to personally thank you. and you can go to yarmuth.house.gov, is that you are talking about introducing -
for that cycle of prosperity that i described to happen. the job of our government is to create an environment where people are encouraged to and it is easier for them to risk the money they have access to in order to start up a new business or grow an existing business so they can hire more people and create more jobs for others. there's a lot of things that government can do to help create that environment but there are few that are being discussed. i want to point to three. the first thing is predictability. what do i mean by predictability? what i mean by that is that when someone decides i'm going to open up a business, one of the things that encourages them to hire people is that they know what tomorrow's going to look like. they know what the taxes are going to be, they know what the laws are going to be, they know what the economy's going to look like, and so they feel encouraged because they can pl plan, because they know what tomorrow looks like. imagine now for a moment if you are a businessman or a businesswoman and is deciding whether to hire five people next year or not. one of t
world leaders on the big spring, he having told them to respect the environment, think about the weak and the poor. once again this pope bringing his simple style to the most grand of ceremonies. catholics and the simply curious of every color and creed gathered for a ceremony stretching back thousands of years. 132 official delegations from around the world came, and leaders of every faith. few religious celebrations as grand, or steeped in ritual as the installation of a pope in the catholic church. from early in the day, hundreds of thousands poured into the square. the pope choosing to greet them in an open jeep instead of the well-protected pope mobile. at one point stepping down, reaching out to children, the sick. the cheers of the faithful here, an audible embrace. then the 266th pope praying at the tomb of peter, leaders alongside him healing the divide 1,000 years old. here to witness history, vice president biden and royalty, a humble priest from south america, his message, remember the poor. a communion shared by all, a day no one will forget. and in the last half hour, vi
on record about this, saying it is not good for the environment. >> this pipeline would create 35 permanent jobs and yet if you were to read the normal media reports, you would think this was a creator of hundreds of thousands of jobs. so this is an export pipeline. this is going to create major risks for the us. it goes through one of the largest sources of fresh water, and we don't need the oil. >> bill: what is happening in the senate this week. i know we have talked ahead of time that the senate is voting on this issue -- >> potentially. the budget bill is moving through the senate this week and there is a lot of talk that an amendment will be introduced. so there is a group of senator, again, heavenly backed by oil money, that are pushing an amendment to take the control away from the president and moving the vote to congress. >> bill: who were the senators who are leading the opposition to keystone? >> senator hoven and boxus who have stepped forward for it. senator boxer, senator white house. and like i said before, unfortunately the oil contributions to the
you'll see a depressed environment where the unemployment rate is over 26%, severe austerity cuts and overhauls of gutted worker benefits, safety net programs, harming seniors and the country's poorest populous, taxes on families an businesses have increased at a sharp rate and violent social unrest has become common place. most recently we've seen a proposal to bail out cyprus banks that could raid the savings account of its own population. these are the realities of debt-ridden countries. these are the realities of liberal policies that tax too much, spend too much, borrow too much and produce far too few jobs. we cannot afford the path that we're on. thankfully we have time to change. america's course and the house republican budget provides a so-year plan. it puts brakes on our spending levels, laying out a thoughtful program, reforms to ensure successful government services are solvent for generations to come, prioritizes a comprehensive restructuring of or tax code to simplify the system and improbables our fiscal system in a way -- improves our fiscal system in way that wou
strategic environment and about america's interest forward. finally i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of the most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. fors equally known brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his success in battles in the iraq war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain trus
, not really. if i got compliance. >> can you at least tell us in this environment, the fed looks like the one thing we've learn side more cover for the fed. i don't know how bad it gets in cypress or whether there is contagion, but the fed will go. >> i think from the u.s. economic perspective, in the last few years of summer slowdowns, it doesn't look like that will happen and we're waiting for pullbacks and maybe we're waiting for an opportunity, but it will be time to wait for equities if you get that. >> i think cramer's here and jim, remember early on we were talking about whether the market knows things and it's like we were looking at that big job's number and we didn't talk about it after it happened and we got six or seven straight new highs and a fiscal cliff. is this what we're seeing today, enough to put anything on hold in your view or do things still look pretty good for our markets here. we did have a series and when you look at the charts this weekend, i cannot believe how many straight ups and take a boeing and it is bad news that indonesia did not go with boeing and that sto
for an environment of intellectual curiosity that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hackathons in tech-savvy cities like san francisco, austin, denver, and new york, to forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we will embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we will upgrade gop. com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologists to join our efforts, and it can serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all this, we will enter 2014 and 2016 with a completely revitalized approach to campaign mechanics and tec
institutions that have been welcomed into tenet and an environment where everybody else wanted to reduce us access to care. and you start having a conversation around that and where this would be disrupted in health care services or disruptions in providers. we also have to acknowledge the historical experiences of mistreatment and mistrust in commuters of color as well as lgbt communities have experienced discrimination from health care providers, and also just experienced discrimination just trying to get access to the system. so as we look at health care implementation is not just going to be about what the benefits look like but it's going to be about whether not the lgbt of americans are being overwhelmingly impacted by the hiv epidemic are going to have access to these services that they need. thing about the treatment cascade and one of the things we know from recent analysis of the treatment cascade, by age and race is that younger americans are less likely experience -- less likely to engage in health care system. there's a story behind that don't have the necessary gotten to the h
, and epa, our corporations are putting more chemicals into our environment and into our food, making us sick. chemicals are chemicals. we have got to get our own -- this is democrats in indiana. caller: good morning. thank you for having me on. with president obama going to israel, the point i don't get still, what about the palestinians? is a separateic topic. this is u.s. policy towards syria. what do you think should be u.s. policy towards syria? caller: right now, i don't think we should be the police of the world. --should work to resolve this is an internal issue in syria. if he goes over the border, we should look into it. but we should deal not by ourselves but through other nations, the other arab nations. that is what they are there for. i am not quick about sending our troops to get killed and another war again. here john is a republican in the suburbs and alexandra, virginia. caller: good morning, thank you for taking my call. in regard to u.s. involvement in the commander testified to the senate last week or two is toogo that it propagated, the situation in we don't terms o
this morning, this shows incremental softness in i.t. spending environment. that's weighing on all tech names. ibm is down 1.25%. that's a huge weight on s&p 500 at this hour. a lots of them we are watching in the tech sector. s.a.p. down 2.5%. crm down 1%. it is taking everything down at this point. >> oracle was bad. can't mince words about it. >> was oracle being bad a sign of what's bad in overall tech spending or was oracle bad more of a sign of what's bad at oracle? or both? >> it is a big government provider. dell is, too. that's hurt dell. this was sloppy execution. deliver, deliver, deliver. are they losing share in the cloud? clearly. they won too many nine-figure deals. at the same time the market says i want to buy that weakness. why is lululemon up? they want to buy that weak fles. looking for caterpillar to bottom today. onshore drillers, one of the weakest markets, he should buy those. things come down, people just want to buy them. >> do you agree with this 1% move on lululemon today? >> that it is up? no. i don't like lululemon. talk about bad execution. they've just been ter
that could easily get caught and mangled in devices. monday equipment, the environment was a threat to children as well as the factories that put out the fumes and toxins. when inhaled these children would often result in illness, chronic conditions or disease. and harvesting crops in extreme temperatures during long hours were considered normal for children. the labor movement spearheaded the fight against the child labor practices that were going on. as early as 1836 we had union members of the national trades union convention made the first formal public proposal recommending that states establish a minimum age for factory work. that year massachusetts enacted the first state law restricting child labor for workers under 15. over the next several decades, the efforts of labor movements successfully achieved minimum age laws in other states and in 1881, the a.f.l. proposed a national law banning all children under 14 from employment. and in 1892, the democratic party adopted the a.f.l.'s child labor platform and began to push for a national child labor law. and finally in 1938, co
. the media environment is vast. what represent fully indications will -- what represent fully -- what ramifications will come? what if i do have a government job? you never know. we heard about what happened in benghazi before during and after, not heeding warnings, covering up not quick enough. maybe survivors feel the story is already out there. i'm not sure. >>brian: everyone has a different perspective on the iraq war but yours is valuable because you fought in it. what's your thought ten years since it started? >> it's almost hard to fathom ten years since the war kicked off. i'm proud of what our generation of warriors accomplished, what we fought for. everything that we -- over 4,400 that gave their lives on that sacred ground. thousands more that were wounded in pursuit of that mission. i'm proud of what we did over there. i'm proud of coming home and fighting for the surge, fighting for the will of the american people to finish the job. i wish we finished it in a more proper fashion per se. i honor what these vets have done, and we're thanking them every day. >>brian: what do
. >> and to your point, joe, i think what's happening is a spotlight is being shown on the school environment. and the reason is, kids are in the school building 180 days a year. it is where they consume 50% of their calories per day. so you have a captive audience in the school building. but what we have to do is we have to direct more resources into the school building. the first thing that's getting cut is access to healthy nutrition. the first thing that's getting cut is access to physical activity. which is why we made an announcement with the first lady just a couple weeks ago, let's move active schools to get more kids out there and moving. it's critical, though, i come from the business world. and the first thing when i stepped into this epidemic that i said to dr. satcher and to some of our partners is, no one of us can do this alone. there's no one size fits all strategy. we have to do this in a collaborative effort together. so we focus largely on bringing the private sector into the conversation. how do we form a public/private partnership where corporate america is brought into t
jobs, clean up the environment, and be able to keep our way of life going on the chesapeake bay. so, madam president, you can see why today we just had three great marylanders, each doing a very different thing, but what i'm so proud of with, you know, captain cullen, larry symms, christina quigley is that each in their own way was trying to make a difference, wanted to protect america. the other was to protect jobs and a way of life on the chesapeake bay. and the other to inspire young women not only to be ready for the playing fields of la crosse but for the playing fields of life. all three, in her own way, were inspirational leaders. all three, in their own way, made a difference in the lives of the people that they came in touch w i just want to say, god bless them and god treat them kindly and may their souls rest in peace. madam president, i yield the floor. ms. mikulski: madam president, i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call:
about money or the environment. >> i think life's about experiences and about connection and about relationships. and so i think you want to sort of maximize your time focused on that and minimize your time focused on acquiring more stuff and dealing with it. >> now, graham hill does acknowledge that if you're married or you have children, the minimalist lifestyle is a lot tougher, matt lauer. >> i'll say, the older you get, the more you like that no-clutter feel. thank you very much. i would like to try it, craig, thank you. >> thank you. >> when we come back, martha stewart's here to make us all feel inadequate about decorating our easter eggs. but first, this is "today" on nbc. for your first day? yeah. ♪ dad: you'll be fine, ok? girl: ok. dad: you look so pretty. ♪ i'm overprotective. that's why i got a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>> martha on "today" is brought to you by macy's. >> and we're back at 8:51 with martha. fun and festive ways to decorate your easter eggs. martha stewart is here with a few of her ideas straight from the pages of "martha st
extreme position to take to prevent the environmental protection agency from protecting the environment. my amendment is an amendment that says that -- that the carbon emission standards must be cost-effective and we all agree that they should be cost-effective. it should be base upon best available science and benefit low-income and middle-class families. i think we could all agree, i would hope, on the amendment that i would offer and i would hope we would do that and allow the environmental protection agency to carry out its critical mission on behalf of the people of this country. mr. inhofe: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: madam president, i'd like to ask one question of the author and then make a comment. first of all, this does not authorize the e.p.a. to regulate in any way. this sets the standards; is that correct? mr. cardin: the senator is correct. mr. inhofe: okay. madam president, i support this amendment. i suggest that we voice vote it. the presiding officer: if there's no further debate, all those in favor say aye. all those
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)